Violinist Asi Mathatias – Talent forges its way

Fortunate for violinist Asi Mathatias, his prodigal musical gift has been recognized at a young age. Born in Jerusalem and growing up in Herzelyah, he heard Heifetz performing on the radio, making up his mind instantly that this was, what he wanted to be doing, just as well. While his debut at age 12 with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Zubin Mehta may be deemed an impressive undertaking in and of itself, it just marked another checkpoint on the path of high expectations for the young musician, geared to master the virtuosity of the violin. The year following his inaugural performance of Mozart’s G-Major Violin Concerto No. 3, recorded as part of a BBC documentary, Mehta invited him back to perform Saint-Sains Violin Concerto No.3.

Described by Zubin Mehta as:”extremely musical, sensitive and technically accurate,” the maestro went further and personally advocated for Mathatias’ acceptance at the famed Vienna Hochschule for Musik, Mehta’s own former breeding grounds. Esteemed pedagogue Christian Altenburger accepted Mathatias as the youngest student, age 16, at time and Peter Landesman, director of the Salzburg Festival, arranged for a host family for Mathatias,  who arrived to Vienna in 2004. “My parents did not believe that their spoiled, little son could make it on their own,” remembers Mathatias, but he did prove them wrong. After a couple of months with his host family, he decided it was time to move out and to keep house for himself in Vienna, during his beginning studies at the university. It was by invitation from Pinchas Zuckermann, that the next dream came true for Mathatias; to study under the wings of the legendary violinist, at New York’s Manhattan School of Music. “He is very demanding,” he says about Zuckerman, and admits:” it was a bit overwhelming at first.”

Thinking his famous teacher would be impressed by his intense schooling and self assured, prodigal technique, Mathatias was in for a rude awakening:”No one can impress him, of course, I went through a very tough regiment of “cleaning house,” he says. At first a bit rebellious, Mathatias learned to accepted the “grounding” experience, which ultimately made him a more secure and more mature musician. “It was very good for me, after my experience in Israel and Vienna, I was able to handle this new discipline, going back to the fundamentals of violin playing, like basically going back to open strings. I am not sure how it would have been, had I come straight to Zukerman,” he says. ”I was used to performing a lot, already by then. Already when I came to Vienna, I had quite a number of concerts; now I had to cancel most all of my engagements. Zukerman did not care about performing while studying, his standpoint was:” You are here to build a lasting career.”

In December he finished studies for his Masters degree at the Manhattan school of Music, and he is convinced he would follow his master’s firm yet inspirational way, should he ever be teaching himself:”You have to start with a clean slate. You are not going to become a different player, but it changes your approach completely… you become demure.”

While he was worried to lose momentum to build up his performance career, in hindsight he sees how important it was to reevaluate his early gained confidence. From day one, he also worked with Zukerman’s teaching assistant Patinka Kopec, whose persistence and strict supervision was what he needed to kill his darlings and ultimately truly progress. “I was a wild boy from Israel, a little cocky and convinced, things would continue to come so easy to me,” he smiles. After working hard for a few years, things turned around.”I developed a real work ethic, which in turn allowed me the freedom, to fully appreciate the inspirational side. Having such personal access and the privilege to hearing Zukermann play up close, is a revelation. His incredible sound, striking for a string instrument and his analytical thoughts are so fascinating. I always thought you can’t teach sound, but Zukermann always says:”Sound is your bank account, without it you make no money.” He is able to teach the abc’s of getting good sound, how to control your bow arm, how to hold the instrument properly and adjust the bow arm according to your shape and size of your hand. Even sound comes from the right distribution of the weight of your fingers and your arm. There is a method to the madness, although, having said that, there is always the individual way of what works for you. Many great musicians had quite unconventional ways of applying their own technique and still did fantastic, just think of Heifetz, whose bowing goes probably against everything we know, still succeeding with such fantastic results,” he says. “Zukerman believes in the “natural” way of playing, in order to avoid injuries. That means without straining or forcing, in any way. That means you have to build up your capacity constantly, since wanting to express something, without having the technical means, tenses you up immediately.  It’s something that requires a lot of guidance, and he provided that en galore. Not every great player can teach from his own experiences, but he certainly gives you an all around approach to playing violin and its many different sound roles, when playing in a small or large environment, with or without an orchestral context, understanding its surrounding sound instead of just focusing on its melodic line.  So many years of experience, performing with such ease…Zukerman’s example makes it quite clear that making music is not only a profession but a very particular way of life,” says Mathatias.

In February of 2015, Mathatias will perform his debut recital at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall with Manhattan School of Music alumni, pianist Dominic Cheli. He will then take his program of Brahms/Strauss/Saint-Saens to Europe, performing at the Berlin Philharmonic with pianist Victor Stanislavsky, view excerpts here.

For an early-bird preview of his program, visit GetClassical’s series at Zinc Bar, where he will perform with pianist Dominic Cheli on November 6, 2014.

For more information about the artist and his upcoming performance at Zinc Bar visit GetClassical’s website.

International flavor with Czech tradition

SubCulture, the intimate downtown performance venue, has established itself as an outlet for world-class performances. They have programmed these performances in collaboration with the greater Institutions of the classical world like the 92Y, and the New York Philharmonic. Yesterday’s evening with the Smetana Trio, jointly presented by SubCulture and the 92Y, brought musical mastery and [...]

Pianist Alexandre Moutouzkine – modernist Cuban idiom and Russian virtuosity in New York

“It is that level of greatness that is intoxicating, connecting with great art and with the meaning behind it all…rarely achieved, but always strived for. It is that energy, which comes from the music itself, these sounds that embody a message…as a performer you are in the ocean, with the movement of the music, and when the wave rises – and you catch it – it raises you – and your audience. It’s magic, and all about that energy that is in the sound, just like ultrasound has the power to heal; music can change everything on a molecular level. But on stage you are in the moment, you can never play the same exact way again, but you have that energy and what you do with it – like in real life – is up to you in that instant.”

Sivan Magen – fresh sounding promise of David’s harp

While there are an astounding number of harpists around, who, as Sivan shares, are flocking somewhat regularly (every three years) to worldwide harp conventions by the hundreds, a harp performance these days, whether solo or in a chamber music setting, is still quite the rarity.

Pianist Lily Maisky and Cellist Mischa Maisky – musicality in the genes

“It is important to know one’s strength and weaknesses and I feel I have the gift to listen to others and have the flexibility to adept to different styles and performance situations and I find the dialogue on stage utmost exciting. Every chamber music partner has the potential to inspire a different kind of collaboration and to explore and present the repertoire in a different way,” she explains.

Donal Fox – Playing With the Classical Imperative

Donal sees improvisation in the foreground of the creative process. “The more I read about the history, it was clear to me that improvising was part of what a great musician had to do. Mozart was improvising. Beethoven was improvising! He may have written the score down later on for his great patrons or the publisher, but his composition process is based on improvisation, and this is the real genesis of creativity,” he explains in our meeting on the eve of his recent Jazz at Lincoln Center duo performance with the virtuosic vibraphonist Warren Wolf. “Whether it is the great classics, or whether it’s jazz, they come from the same creative place. In most classical music, the melody and harmonic structure dominate, while the rhythm comes more to the forefront in jazz. Many classical composers, for example Stravinsky, have been influenced by jazz, the musical language that is the African-American cultural language of the melting pot fusion, and,” he continues, “that reminds me of something: a very young Mick Jagger said on a talk show interview, before he became Mr. Rolling Stones: ‘I am really trying to be James Brown – this is how it comes out.’” Fox says, endearingly: “In this sense, I am trying to improvise like Beethoven – what comes out is Fox.”

Pianist Roman Rabinovich – balance of mind, hands, and heart

There is darkness, and then the evocative, abstract sound of a narrative piano and cello piece setting the tone and interacting with the screen’s wide-angle focus on New York City by night. The camera zooms in on a young painter, wrestling with artistic perfection in differently crafted self-portraits. Reality, vision, and self-doubt infuse the main [...]

Thriving on the efforts of its musical community: the Manchester Music Festival

When recently taking over the chair of the artistic committee, Telscher followed Mary Miller, whose own pianistic background and passionate engagement for the festival made her an advocate for finding and bringing great pianists to the festival. Says Telscher,”I had big shoes to fill, Mary did a fantastic job! The biggest challenge is that the costs of presenting can never be fully paid through ticket sales alone, and people have to understand that we have to pay living wages for the artists, which don’t just cover the performances, but endless hours of preparation.”

Making of a Modern Musician

“Due to the shrinking market for traditional classical music, its “graying” audience and overall lack of funding for costly productions, the generation of the great impresarios and dedicated press coverage has vanished. Because of all this, the solo-piano virtuoso is all but dead,” she commented. “However,” she continued, “where there is crisis – there is opportunity.”

Mostly Martha – The Progetto Martha Argerich in Lugano

“Martha needs to play concerts, at least a good amount of them; she can never be without music,” says Piccardi, who seems to know this from a place in his heart that understands her. He adds: “chamber music is like a life elixir for her,” and when one sees her in action, one has to believe him. Her playing has remains unchanged: her tone is natural, highly imaginative, and brilliant, and it is exciting to watch her pour all of herself into the piano.