The Gümüşlük International Classical Music Festival

“When I think about Gümüşlük, I can’t stop smiling. The warmth and hospitality of its people, the sunshine, the sea and the spectacular concert venue make me want to come back again and again,” says renowned Russian-American pianist  Ilya Itin. photo – Aljazeera

Itin is a prestigious guest artist and returning pedagogue at the Turkish music festival, and a personal friend of its propelling forces, the festival’s founders, Eren Levendoğlu and Gülsin Onay.

 

 

 

Onay, one of Turkey’s foremost pianists, has taken on the role of artistic advisor, working closely with the artistic director of the festival, Eren Levendoĝlu. The festival celebrated its 10th anniversary this summer.

Levendoĝlu had the idea to start the festival in a small, idyllic fishing village, steeped in the history and ruins of the ancient Mediterranean city of Myndos. She says, “I had just graduated from London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama and was looking for an alternative lifestyle in music without the stress and rigorous schedule of the conservatory.” The locale was a romantic escape from the big cities for many artists, and Levendoĝlu found refuge – and her future husband –at the Eklisia Church-turned-arts center located In the center of town, yet just steps away from the ocean.

The first thing to do was to get a piano into the space for her to practice on. The instrument that got things going was a makeshift upright that had fallen from a truck and was in bad condition. Levendoĝlu’s search for a piano tuner led her to Onay, who was visiting her summer home the next town over. The renowned pianist’s enthusiastic reaction to the idea of creating a festival matched Levendoĝlu’s passion for the project. Over tea, plans were turned into action, as the two women motivated other musicians, including the head of the faculty of music at Bilkent University in Ankara, Isin Metin, to get involved. Levendoĝlu mobilized everyone around her according to their trades: Her cousin, a graphic designer, made posters, a friend wrote press releases, yet another friend sponsored the wine, and the response was overwhelming. “The church seats only 60 people and there was an overflow into the garden, where we put up a screen and a sound system. Over 800 people attended the concerts and the press responded wholeheartedly,” remembers Levendoĝlu. Master classes followed in 2006, the festival’s third year, and expanded from the original piano festival into its broader framework of a classical music festival, even featuring its first symphonic orchestral concert, attracting sponsors and international artists to come on board. By 2011, the festival was in full swing with all its pedagogical and performing activities, supporting Turkish music students and promoting the work of Turkish composer Ahmet Adnan Saygun to the younger generation. As one of the premier proponents of Saygun’s work, Onay had set out building her distinguished career as an international performing pianist, never losing sight of her Turkish identity. It is thanks to her great initiative, as much as to her warm personality, that the festival attracts not only fans and local artists, but musicians from around the world, and acts as a true messenger of cultural diplomacy.

In 2012, the festival moved from its original location to an ancient stone quarry situated on the southwestern seaside of Gümüşlük’s Koyunbaba area, gaining an idyllic panoramic view and further artistic participation, contributing to its significant cultural stance.

Today, a varied mix of nationalities present myriad genres at the festival’s annual six-week summer program, filling the Mediterranean landscape with music ranging from Jazz to classical, and including such artists as pianist Fazil Say from Turkey, Yury Martynov from Russia, Mauricio Vallina from Cuba, Pierre Reach from France, and Italian guitarist Carlo Domeniconi. A growing number of various instrumentalists, among them Portugese bassoon player Rul Lopez and French oboe player Celine Moinet, have made this a true classical music fest.

Supported by the Bodrum Classical Music Association and the Bodrum Chamber of Commerce, the festival carries an academic and educational outreach element, bringing the newest research and developments in the field of music education to the enthusiastic local student body of its academy. Edna Golandsky, for example, co-founder of the New York-based Golandsky Institute, has returned to a loyal group of students for the past several years, bringing her teachings on how to gain natural pianistic facility building on the principals of the ‘Dorothy Taubman approach,’ to a growing branch of the Institute’s following. Master classes are held in piano, flute, cello, harp, voice, conducting, clarinet, guitar, viola, and violin, and – thanks to the multi-talented Fazil Say –composition has lately been added to the programs offered.

 

Run with the help of its association of volunteers, in addition to its three-person staff, the festival holds its own, even next to the big festivals in the Istanbul area, boasting a uniquely intimate and welcoming character. Perhaps the most significant attribute of the festival remains its special atmosphere, the naturally ambient and enjoyable spirit of the event augmented by impromptu performances at the beach and local restaurants. One finds plenty of opportunities in Gümüşlük for open-minded cultural exchange, both on a musical and social level; an important outlet in today’s politically challenged cultural climate in flux between Orient and Occident.

 

 

Quintessentially Russian: Philippe Quint’s new Tchaikovsky/Arensky recording

Intended as a memorial to Tchaikovsky, Arensky’s quartet, Op.35, includes themes of the master’s Chansons Enfantines, Op. 54 in the variations of the quartet’s second movement, adding Russian patriotic themes, like the hymn Slava Bogu no nebe slava, which draws from an ancient funeral mass and was also used in the ceremonial tradition of the crowning of the Tsar, turning Tchaikovsky, as Quint observes, into “the Tsar of composers.”

Music and Film – Touching the sound

Rosen seeks out his film’s characters according to the drama they convey. He looks for storylines created by individuals’ conflicts, their relationships with others or their own artistic personality, and most importantly by their redemption: overcoming their individual challenges – that’s the story he tells, amidst each project’s own, particular soundtrack.

Violinist Asi Mathatias – Talent forges its way

He is able to teach the abc’s of getting good sound, how to control your bow arm, how to hold the instrument properly and adjust the bow arm according to your shape and size of your hand. Even sound comes from the right distribution of the weight of your fingers and your arm. There is a method to the madness, although, having said that, there is always the individual way of what works for you. Many great musicians had quite unconventional ways of applying their own technique and still did fantastic, just think of Heifetz, whose bowing goes probably against everything we know, still succeeding with such fantastic results,” he says. “Zukerman believes in the “natural” way of playing, in order to avoid injuries. That means without straining or forcing, in any way. That means you have to build up your capacity constantly, since wanting to express something, without having the technical means, tenses you up immediately. It’s something that requires a lot of guidance, and he provided that en galore. Not every great player can teach from his own experiences, but he certainly gives you an all around approach to playing violin and its many different sound roles, when playing in a small or large environment, with or without an orchestral context, understanding its surrounding sound instead of just focusing on its melodic line. So many years of experience, performing with such ease…Zukerman’s example makes it quite clear that making music is not only a profession but a very particular way of life,” says Mathatias.

International flavor with Czech tradition

SubCulture, the intimate downtown performance venue, has established itself as an outlet for world-class performances. They have programmed these performances in collaboration with the greater Institutions of the classical world like the 92Y, and the New York Philharmonic. Yesterday’s evening with the Smetana Trio, jointly presented by SubCulture and the 92Y, brought musical mastery and [...]

Pianist Alexandre Moutouzkine – modernist Cuban idiom and Russian virtuosity in New York

“It is that level of greatness that is intoxicating, connecting with great art and with the meaning behind it all…rarely achieved, but always strived for. It is that energy, which comes from the music itself, these sounds that embody a message…as a performer you are in the ocean, with the movement of the music, and when the wave rises – and you catch it – it raises you – and your audience. It’s magic, and all about that energy that is in the sound, just like ultrasound has the power to heal; music can change everything on a molecular level. But on stage you are in the moment, you can never play the same exact way again, but you have that energy and what you do with it – like in real life – is up to you in that instant.”

Sivan Magen – fresh sounding promise of David’s harp

While there are an astounding number of harpists around, who, as Sivan shares, are flocking somewhat regularly (every three years) to worldwide harp conventions by the hundreds, a harp performance these days, whether solo or in a chamber music setting, is still quite the rarity.

Pianist Lily Maisky and Cellist Mischa Maisky – musicality in the genes

“It is important to know one’s strength and weaknesses and I feel I have the gift to listen to others and have the flexibility to adept to different styles and performance situations and I find the dialogue on stage utmost exciting. Every chamber music partner has the potential to inspire a different kind of collaboration and to explore and present the repertoire in a different way,” she explains.

Donal Fox – Playing With the Classical Imperative

Donal sees improvisation in the foreground of the creative process. “The more I read about the history, it was clear to me that improvising was part of what a great musician had to do. Mozart was improvising. Beethoven was improvising! He may have written the score down later on for his great patrons or the publisher, but his composition process is based on improvisation, and this is the real genesis of creativity,” he explains in our meeting on the eve of his recent Jazz at Lincoln Center duo performance with the virtuosic vibraphonist Warren Wolf. “Whether it is the great classics, or whether it’s jazz, they come from the same creative place. In most classical music, the melody and harmonic structure dominate, while the rhythm comes more to the forefront in jazz. Many classical composers, for example Stravinsky, have been influenced by jazz, the musical language that is the African-American cultural language of the melting pot fusion, and,” he continues, “that reminds me of something: a very young Mick Jagger said on a talk show interview, before he became Mr. Rolling Stones: ‘I am really trying to be James Brown – this is how it comes out.’” Fox says, endearingly: “In this sense, I am trying to improvise like Beethoven – what comes out is Fox.”

Pianist Roman Rabinovich – balance of mind, hands, and heart

There is darkness, and then the evocative, abstract sound of a narrative piano and cello piece setting the tone and interacting with the screen’s wide-angle focus on New York City by night. The camera zooms in on a young painter, wrestling with artistic perfection in differently crafted self-portraits. Reality, vision, and self-doubt infuse the main [...]